33rd Chaos Communication Congress

I spent the time between Christmas and New Year in Hamburg, Germany, at the Chaos Communication Congress, 33rd edition (33C3 in short). 33C3’s motto was “Works for Me”, a phrase that everyone working in IT/engineering will hear at some point during their career. It quickly became a meme in the congress, showing up every time a presenter had a laptop issue for example.

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Global Game Jam

As last year, I took part in the local Global Game Jam chapter. As last year, we had about 48 hours to create a video game about a specific theme, revealed at the beginning of the jam. I took part with almost the same team as last year (kudos to them):

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A value chain approach to understanding Open Source software

Open Source is a way of developing products – usually software ones, although this is changing – in an open and public way. To qualify as “proper” Open Source, a product must grant several key freedoms to its customers: The user must be free to use the product, they must be free to copy the product, they must be free to study and modify the product. This approach to software distribution started in the 1970s. At first it only applied to research projects produced in universities, but in the 1990s it became used commercially, especially as backend (i.e. not user-facing) systems. In recent years, Open Source software left the backend and is now very present even in customer facing products.

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Using Dnsmasq for VM testing

Today I was trying a new configuration option for Gitlab and I wanted to make sure I did not make any mistakes before trying the site live. Therefore I decided to deploy the configuration in a virtual machine and then copy it on the live server.

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Using GCC's Stack Smashing Protector on microcontrollers

Writing your code in C means manual memory management means a lot of bug types: Double free, use after free, stack overflow, etc. Those bugs can be especially hard to debug because they will cause erratic behavior but might not trigger an error condition immediately.

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10/10, will do again

Last weekend I took part in the global game jam chapter organized in my home town. For those who don’t know the concepts of a game jam, it is a type of events where team gathers to make a game in 48h. The global in the name means that it simultaneously takes place all over the world, both remotely and with physical gatherings.

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32nd Chaos Communication Congress

I am currently in the airport waiting for my plane to go back from Hamburg, where I attended the 32nd Chaos Communication Congress (32C3 for short). I decided to write a list of all the talks I watched and add a short personal commentary. As I am doing this immediately after please excuse the brievity of some commentaries.

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Rust bare metal on ARM microcontroller

Recently at the CVRA we decided to rewrite one important external library writen in C++. We wanted to rewrite in C, but since Rust recently hit beta I wanted to see if it was feasible to use it for our application. To do this, I decided to write a little demo application using Rust on a Texas Instruments Tiva Launchpad dev board.

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Using BusBlaster v3/v4 on OSX

I recently got myself a Macbook Pro as my main laptop. The migration was fine except for one thing: My Dangerous Prototype BusBlaster (3rd generation) was not usable. Since a friend’s 2nd generation one was working flawlessly, I supposed there must be a way to do it.

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Running Github's Hubot as Upstart job

In this post I just want to explain how to run Github’s Hubot automatically using Ubuntu.

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